Akudo Joy Adiboshi – How Uniforms Have Changed in the Nursing Industry

Akudo Joy Adiboshi is a nurse from Hollywood, Florida. She enjoys helping those in need and provides the highest level of care possible to her patients. Akudo Joy Adiboshi likes to learn about the historical trends in nursing and how those trends influence the nursing world of today. One of the fascinating trends in nursing history is the development of nursing uniforms. They have changed greatly since the 19th century.

Akudo Joy Adiboshi

During the 19th century, nurses’ uniforms were comparable to many servants’ uniforms. They were typically a black or printed gown with a white apron and white banded or gathered cap. As nurses become better trained and the field gained more respect, the uniforms developed to be more ladylike with white aprons and caps to indicate that the women were nurses. Florence Nightingale helped to further change the uniforms with the professionalism she brought to the field. She introduced hats with different colored bands to indicate rank. New students would wear blue, pink and other pastel colored ribbon bands to indicate that they were new or still in training. Senior nurses wore black ribbons bands to symbolize their seniority.

During the 20th century up until World War I, white bibs and pockets were added to nurses’ dresses. Large hats, similar to a nun’s hat and veil, were also worn. After WWI the uniforms were redesigned to make them more practical. Bulky aprons were removed, shirts were made shorter, and sleeves were able to be rolled up.

By the 1950s, the elaborate and heavy crown-like caps were replaced by simpler folded paper caps. The colored seniority ribbons were also removed to prevent discrimination by experience level. Dresses were also made to be less form-fitting and easier to wear, wash, and iron.
Akudo Joy Adiboshi loves being a nurse and helping patients as much as possible.

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